A Nameless Dread.

Bion’s use of the term ‘Nameless dread is simply a placeholder for an indescribable feeling that takes place during a traumatic event and plays a critical role in the development of a person. If an event cannot be woven into the fabric of the psyche, something harmful happens. Unconsciously, a promise is made with the self. You will never have to feel nameless dread ever again but in return you will give up part of yourself. This promise however, comes at a great cost. The edges of spontaneity, vulnerability, creativity, openness to explore, learn, and take in what is new will be compromised.

‘Just because you’re invited, doesn’t mean you’re wanted’

From ‘Get Out’ by Jordan Peele     My role as a psychotherapist working in Central London brings me face to face with people of many different backgrounds, ages, races, class and political and religious viewpoint. The origins of psychotherapy lie in Europe which was mostly created by middle class white men to treat mainly […]

Where all new things are possible

A Soft-edged Reed of Light That was the house where you asked me to remain on the eve of my planned departure. Do you remember? The house remembers it — the deal table with the late September sun stretched on its back. As long as you like, you said, and the chairs, the clock, the […]

A resolution to make new friends

After the manic activity that is Christmas and New Year. My resolution for 2018 is to make more friends. Not acquaintances, or people who further my career or lifestyle, but friends. Meaningful human connections that feel comfortable, enriching and authentic. Not those that leave me feeling lonelier in company than when I am actually alone. […]

Word of Mouth: London Conversations

I was fortunate enough to be interviewed by author Lily Clayton Hansen for her upcoming book “Word of Mouth – London Conversations’. She has an amazingly intuitive and empathetic style and captures the stories of interesting people across the globe. You can read an excerpt from the interview here. Sophia.


Melancholy, Degas 1874.

The term melancholia has served many uses in literature and poetry. It is perhaps particularly useful as a semantic device in English language writing, where few nouns exist to describe a state of mind which is at once calm, fearful, despairing, restless, hollow, and longing for something inexpressible.